@BLK_PEEPSTOP No. VIII

stp being lazy n ur wrk ethic, especially when working 4 othr black people. its a new day lethargy has no place n obamas nation  

#blackpeople complain that other #blackpeople do bad business. did u tell them about, & give those people a chance 2 correct their mistakes

black people everybody makes mistakes. if u do not or are not allowed 2 learn from ur mistakes is where the problem comes in.

black people n other communities, person is assigned a job & is the go 2 person 4 that job even if a fuck up, they’rereprimanded & keep job

black people after so many fuck ups, the person learns from mistakes & becomes a better professional till they no longer make mistakes black people this is how the lawyer becomes great, the doctor becomes great. they r supported by their community until they r great#support

There is a dark cloud over Black American people when it comes to doing business for one another; we tend to take one or the other for granted as customer, employer or employee. We tend to approach the business matter as if we are friends with the other Black American and they understand our personal problems which hinder us from doing the job in a timely manner or properly and vice versa. THIS IS AN IMPROPER APPROACH, especially as it relates to the new millennium. Though I do not perform my work with clients in that manner, I do feel it is a road block to me obtaining the type of clients I want, i.e. The Therapy Wine Bar and Voudou Bar, as well as Bed-Vyne wine; all within Bedford-Stuyvesant Brooklyn. I’ve spoken with the partners of each of these establishments and they each kindly blew me off as if I was not a real CPA, or that I must have been joking when inquiring to them about that type of business and they quickly argued me down when trying to push them on the matter; or placated me in face to face conversation, but never returned e-mails or calls.

Friends of mine who purchased a nice 3 bedroom home in Greensboro, NC told me a story of trying to give a Black American woman real estate agent a chance to show them homes in the area, which they described to her where they wanted to live, the type of home, school system for their child etc. They told a story that she showed them nothing of what they informed her to; and the last straw that broke the camel’s back, she showed up late to an appointment with rollers in her head. They quickly took their business to a White American male real estate agent who quickly showed them exactly what they wanted, where they wanted and they closed the deal in 30 days. I’ve heard other stories of details not being taken care of in other matters. THIS MUST STOP! BUSINESS IS BUSINESS, and in business, the person you’re doing business with IS NOT YOUR FRIEND! They are your customer, to be treated with the utmost respect and professional care to seal all of the details of the job to complete it with the best of your absolute ability.

But on the part of Black American consumers of Black American services and products, in an effort to heal and progress in the process, I asked my friends from Greensboro, North Carolina these questions: did you tell the lady her first mistake, after the first showing, of not showing property in the preferred area? Did you tell her after the second disappointing showing? When she showed up late with the rollers in her hair, did you properly reprimand her for her behavior, fire her and tell her why she was being fired? To each of the questions they replied NO! They, with their properly justifiable frustrations took their business to the most-mighty of all business dealings, A WHITE AMERICAN MAN!

It is understandable that Black American people would naturally think if a person is in legitimate business as a professional, they should know how to conduct themselves as such. Many minority Black American business owners do conduct themselves with the utmost ethical and professional standard in all dealings, but many others also tend to relax their professional presentation when dealing with other Black American people. It is a natural sense of commonality that is ingrained within the Black American diaspora and struggle within the United States of America that brings this about; seemingly saying, you should understand, overlook and/or excuse my behavior as between family not to be disclosed to outsiders. Maybe in the 1960s, – 1990s, but in the new millennium, this attitude is not excusable and though still very prevalent, it is also the duty of those insulted by inferior service from their Black American brothers and sisters to make known the indiscretion, give a warning and chance for correction and upon final termination of service, outline the reason for termination.          

In every learned subject, there is a process: talking, learning another language, potty training, criminal court. The process is there to help those going through it to learn from it, its inter-workings: pull your pants down, sit on or stand in front of the toilet, release; if you release on or in your clothes, you’ve done it wrong, receive your reprimand and try to do better the next time. Without the process of reprimand and explanation of the wrong course of action taken, there is no learning. And though many Black American people may say, “that is not my job to teach other Black American people, I can just go to someone better”, more likely than not, a White American person; this, in the long-term does not help our race of people become better people, better business persons to build better companies for our future children to gain skills and employment.

If we do not start thinking macro instead of micro, the same complaints that were had 20 years ago (1984), the same complaints we have today will be the same complaints we have 20 years from now (2034): high unemployment among Black American people especially males; takes twice or three times as long for a Black American man to get a job than any other person; Black American people do not do great professional detailed work. Our children especially the males aren’t going for college education in greater numbers; probably because you did not have patience to work with and/or hire a Black American real estate agent, Black American lawyer, Black American CPA/Accountant and if you felt they needed it, in reference to improper service that was given you, reprimand them and tell them to correct their mistakes.

@BLK_PEEPSTOP No. 0

One night, Nov 9, 2012 4:00 AM, while expunging excrement from my body after having eaten a whole bag of Chips-A-Hoy chocolate chip cookies and four bowls of Honey Nut Cheerios, all with milk, while also high on an Ice Coffee – I usually do not drink coffee – I had purchased earlier from “The Pantry” on Decatur and Lewis Ave, after my two mile run around the Bedford Stuyvesant Brooklyn, NY block of Decatur and Chauncey Street between Lewis and Stuyvesant Avenues; I was reading a book, “Men Woman and Children” by Chad Kultgen. I thought the book to be true to average American middle class White American life; it was a dramedy and I was enjoying the read. It hit me, that while I already had a book in production which would take me years to finish, and just after hearing from my girlfriend I’d been involved with for 11 years (currently my fiancé as of this writing in 2013) (it’s currently 2019 and economics of it taking a Black American man twice/three times as long to find employment as a White American man, the relationship has dissolved.) through an emotional tumultuous relationship which had not culminated into marriage just yet, that I would be a good writer, a project which I thought I could finish very quickly as a book and maybe even a series of books came to mind.          

One day Oct 4, 2012 as I had come home from a morning run around Boys and Girls High School track in Bedford Stuyvesant Brooklyn, searching for a new employment position and dealing with covert (so they thought) discrimination of recruiting agencies as well as from individual company HR recruiters who all would call me at this time due to a great background and resume, but the moment they heard my voice – which I was not doing my job to disguise it to sound like Brian Gumble, defunct of any natural bass and/or Black inflections in his speech – and heard that I was a Black American man, it seems they quickly lost interest in speaking with me regarding Accounting Manager positions paying $85,000 – $110,000 even though I had 10 solid years of work experience, 5 at the last company I was employed. I had recently passed my Certified Public Accountants (CPA) examination, which I thought would boost my credentials as a job candidate, but companies all seemed to have no interest in finding me positions or hiring me.

A deep enmity for Corporate America and in tandem White America began to brew inside me. I began to despise my own race of people because I thought, due to their ignorant ethos, cultural shibboleths and ways of living, it was reflecting badly on me in the eyes of recruiting agencies and employers who took the chance to invite me in for a personal interview, but I was not receiving any offers.  On this night in October is when I came up with the Twitter name @BLK_PEEPSTOP (since then, no longer active) to expunge all of my thoughts about things Black American people do, don’t do, say, don’t say, think and don’t think which are either beneficial or detrimental to Black American people’s survival on American soil.

For it seemed to me White America and Corporate America had and have been discriminating against Black Americans blatantly in the early 60s and 70s and covertly during the 80s, 90s, 2000s and beyond; you’d think we’d get it by now and wean ourselves off of their placating, assuaging and coddling us, to become our own independent society who covertly (just as they do us) does not deal with or need them to survive. This charge was further exacerbated on Sun Nov 4, 2012 when I got my hands on a book called “Jerusalem 1913”, a story of how Zionist Russian and German Jews infiltrated Palestine in the early 1900s and took over the land to brew the boiling pot that cooks to this very day of Arabs having been pushed out of Jerusalem, fighting and bombing Israelites.

As I began to read my tweets, I thought that while some needed no further explanation, many others were not inexplicable and needed further analysis. So I started to write a book of my interpretations of the tweets. At the start of this book, there were 494 tweets directed at Black American people to infuriate them, educate them and hopefully get some discourse going of how we can become a better people. A few people started following me on twitter, but I quickly blocked them because I did not want any people of any kind, any organization following me; eventually, I came to the conclusion, I DID NOT WANT ANYONE FOLLOWING THIS TWITTER PAGE.

I addressed most of my tweets starting with: #blackpeople, hoping that would reach a number of them out in the tweet-o-sphere / Black Twitter, but that did not seem to be doing anything. I wondered if my tweets were getting blocked because they were too political or of a strong seditious nature. The first few days the tweets came to mind in rapid succession but quickly began to slow down. I surmised in my mind I was not doing this for followers, but to get this info out of my head and consciousness as I was talking to myself rather constantly on these particular issues because one can not readily verbalize these type of phrases or thoughts to Black American people without them getting very defensive or upset: as I tried many of times to disseminate some of these thoughts on my girlfriend and got into fervent discussions, she called them “arguments, which left her uneasy and losing sleep.”

My point to this whole project is that Black American people do not speak of such ills.  We sit silent while everything goes wrong in our culture, and we are used and abused by White American people of all backgrounds: Italians, Irish, Jewish, WASP, Germans, Russians, etc. Everyone seems scared to address particular issues.

But these are things I’ve reasoned with myself that need to be said directly to Black American people by Black American people.

There is a dichotomy of feeling in my writing, I’m a little jarred when other races of people talk about Black American people in this context, but when I speak on them myself, it seems I harbor many of the same ill feelings.  I think the difference is, I’m expressing these feelings hoping they will be erased and get better, but when other people of other races express these feelings, they are laughing at us with no hope that things will get better. My layout will be simple. I will post the tweet as written on twitter. I will then proceed to explain and articulate, as to what caused the thought behind the tweet and expound upon my direct reasoning and interpretation since twitter does not allow you to do such with just 140 characters.