@BLK_PEEPSTOP No. VIII

stp being lazy n ur wrk ethic, especially when working 4 othr black people. its a new day lethargy has no place n obamas nation  

#blackpeople complain that other #blackpeople do bad business. did u tell them about, & give those people a chance 2 correct their mistakes

black people everybody makes mistakes. if u do not or are not allowed 2 learn from ur mistakes is where the problem comes in.

black people n other communities, person is assigned a job & is the go 2 person 4 that job even if a fuck up, they’rereprimanded & keep job

black people after so many fuck ups, the person learns from mistakes & becomes a better professional till they no longer make mistakes black people this is how the lawyer becomes great, the doctor becomes great. they r supported by their community until they r great#support

There is a dark cloud over Black American people when it comes to doing business for one another; we tend to take one or the other for granted as customer, employer or employee. We tend to approach the business matter as if we are friends with the other Black American and they understand our personal problems which hinder us from doing the job in a timely manner or properly and vice versa. THIS IS AN IMPROPER APPROACH, especially as it relates to the new millennium. Though I do not perform my work with clients in that manner, I do feel it is a road block to me obtaining the type of clients I want, i.e. The Therapy Wine Bar and Voudou Bar, as well as Bed-Vyne wine; all within Bedford-Stuyvesant Brooklyn. I’ve spoken with the partners of each of these establishments and they each kindly blew me off as if I was not a real CPA, or that I must have been joking when inquiring to them about that type of business and they quickly argued me down when trying to push them on the matter; or placated me in face to face conversation, but never returned e-mails or calls.

Friends of mine who purchased a nice 3 bedroom home in Greensboro, NC told me a story of trying to give a Black American woman real estate agent a chance to show them homes in the area, which they described to her where they wanted to live, the type of home, school system for their child etc. They told a story that she showed them nothing of what they informed her to; and the last straw that broke the camel’s back, she showed up late to an appointment with rollers in her head. They quickly took their business to a White American male real estate agent who quickly showed them exactly what they wanted, where they wanted and they closed the deal in 30 days. I’ve heard other stories of details not being taken care of in other matters. THIS MUST STOP! BUSINESS IS BUSINESS, and in business, the person you’re doing business with IS NOT YOUR FRIEND! They are your customer, to be treated with the utmost respect and professional care to seal all of the details of the job to complete it with the best of your absolute ability.

But on the part of Black American consumers of Black American services and products, in an effort to heal and progress in the process, I asked my friends from Greensboro, North Carolina these questions: did you tell the lady her first mistake, after the first showing, of not showing property in the preferred area? Did you tell her after the second disappointing showing? When she showed up late with the rollers in her hair, did you properly reprimand her for her behavior, fire her and tell her why she was being fired? To each of the questions they replied NO! They, with their properly justifiable frustrations took their business to the most-mighty of all business dealings, A WHITE AMERICAN MAN!

It is understandable that Black American people would naturally think if a person is in legitimate business as a professional, they should know how to conduct themselves as such. Many minority Black American business owners do conduct themselves with the utmost ethical and professional standard in all dealings, but many others also tend to relax their professional presentation when dealing with other Black American people. It is a natural sense of commonality that is ingrained within the Black American diaspora and struggle within the United States of America that brings this about; seemingly saying, you should understand, overlook and/or excuse my behavior as between family not to be disclosed to outsiders. Maybe in the 1960s, – 1990s, but in the new millennium, this attitude is not excusable and though still very prevalent, it is also the duty of those insulted by inferior service from their Black American brothers and sisters to make known the indiscretion, give a warning and chance for correction and upon final termination of service, outline the reason for termination.          

In every learned subject, there is a process: talking, learning another language, potty training, criminal court. The process is there to help those going through it to learn from it, its inter-workings: pull your pants down, sit on or stand in front of the toilet, release; if you release on or in your clothes, you’ve done it wrong, receive your reprimand and try to do better the next time. Without the process of reprimand and explanation of the wrong course of action taken, there is no learning. And though many Black American people may say, “that is not my job to teach other Black American people, I can just go to someone better”, more likely than not, a White American person; this, in the long-term does not help our race of people become better people, better business persons to build better companies for our future children to gain skills and employment.

If we do not start thinking macro instead of micro, the same complaints that were had 20 years ago (1984), the same complaints we have today will be the same complaints we have 20 years from now (2034): high unemployment among Black American people especially males; takes twice or three times as long for a Black American man to get a job than any other person; Black American people do not do great professional detailed work. Our children especially the males aren’t going for college education in greater numbers; probably because you did not have patience to work with and/or hire a Black American real estate agent, Black American lawyer, Black American CPA/Accountant and if you felt they needed it, in reference to improper service that was given you, reprimand them and tell them to correct their mistakes.

@BLK_PEEPSTOP No. VI

stop treating other black people when they approach u as if they r incompetent. stop ignoring other black people whenwant to work 4 u

black people u must go about running ur small business with an initiative for future black social change.

black people if u own a small business u can find a black cpa through NABA & if u type in black lawyers association on the web many pop up

some1 said “i’ll never switch from my russian, guy he saves me money.” black slaves saved america money, but america isn’t loyal 2 us. Hmmm!

This tweet was born out of my fantasy that when I passed the CPA Exam, as a Black American CPA, I’d be able to walk up to any Black American business owner, Black American celebrity, Black American NBA/NFL player, Black American rapper and have a brief conversation with them bestowing the knowledge that I was a Black American CPA, pass them my card, we’d exchange information and the person would automatically become a client. My line of thinking was that individual Black American professionals would be delighted to work with other competent, affable, congenial and convivial Black American professional individuals to handle their business matters.

Once I moved to New York, I found a Black American doctor and a Black American dentist. I think of Chris Rock’s comedy skit: “The only Black people who live in my neighborhood are Jay Z, Mary J. Blige and me. Across the street lives a dentist. You know what a Black American dentist would have to do to live in my neighborhood? HE WOULD HAVE HAD TO CREATE TEETH!” This wouldn’t be necessarily true if all of the Black American elite music and movie celebrities, as well as sports stars who live in New York or pass through on assignment would go visit Catrisse Williams, VIP Smiles for their 6 month cleaning or cosmetic dental work. It should be automatic. But Black American people do not think like this.

When I first passed my CPA Exam it was NFL Draft night 2011. I had printed up some make shift cards with the name of my CPA firm and phone number on them. I went and snuck into GreenHouse night club on the corner of Vandam and Varrick Street. As soon as I hit the entrance door to the club, I was looking Shaunie O’neal and Evelyn Lazoda right smack in the face. I had seen Shaunie O’neal earlier in the day at the Converse store on Broadway in SoHo on my lunch break from work.

I thought to approach her, as I felt pretty confident in my outfit, intelligence and articulation, but didn’t have a speech exactly prepared to speak about the subject of becoming her CPA, and plus she had a friend with her so I let the opportunity pass.

In the club I was armed with cards to pass them out to people in VIP and trying to make deals with the pretty ladies in VIP to connect with the guys with money for a commission; with the music blaring, they either could not hear me or had no clue what I was talking about. I approached a few guys who appeared to have money or were brawny enough to be new NFL draftees or current players in the league standing directly inside the section off from the VIP area; they nodded their heads, took my card and went about their way. I made my way over to speak briefly with Shaunie, as I was too afraid to tell her I was a CPA who’d like to work for her, I simply asked her had she noticed me in the Converse store earlier that day. She said something back to me which I could not hear, we smiled at each other and that was that. I had also passed a card to Evelyn Lazoda and said something to the effect of, “I’m a CPA, take my card. I want to make sure you and Ochocinco don’t go broke.” She looked at me in stupefaction, took the card, I bid her a nice night and that was that. Shaunie’s boyfriend at the time was a light skinned young model. She was in the Converse store that day purchasing black Chuck Taylor sneakers for him that he had on his feet that night. I talked with him in the hallway leading to the entrance/exit about being his CPA. He sold me the story that his agency takes care of that business for him. I next bumped right into and gave a card to the boxer Zab Juda, he looked at me as if I was stupid or he didn’t know what I was talking about. At one point, I was standing next to a guy who had on a diamond necklace, I think his name was Pierre. He was in ear shot of me and we could hear each other very well, he said to me, “I have about three CPAs who work for me.” He took my card. I saw him later at the diner on 23rd St. driving a metallic blue S550 Benz AMG, getting out of the car clearly inebriated. I spoke with him once more and showed concern for his safety, which Pierre assured me, he would be OK. He was the guy I had most contact with that night in passing inside the club and at the diner. I never heard from him.

It seems as if on the surface, Black American people take other Black American professionals (CPAs, Lawyers) for granted as not knowing how to handle business. I have asked many Black American business owners in Bed-Stuy the, “whose your CPA?” question. A partner of the Therapy Wine Bar, told me someone they’ve used for 16 years whom I found out was some guy out in Benson Hurst Brooklyn, NY of all places; a place where a Black American man couldn’t mistakenly be caught in the neighborhood or he would be beat, occasionally to death, as was Yusef Hawkins in 1989. One partner of the Voudou Bar said they use some Russian guy who specialized in bars and that he saved them so much money in setting up the POS system, etc, and went into how they wouldn’t have time for me to learn their business and/or make mistakes; therefore they would never hire me as the main CPA of the bar that I’d supported with my dollars as a patron, as does many other Black American persons in the neighborhood, simply because it’s Black American owned. They would not grant a Black American CPA the same courtesy their business was thriving on. Of course this conversation was taking place on a Saturday night, with me being full of liquid courage (though, I do not think the person knew that) and I have not had a chance to initiate a formal meeting; I’ll let you know how that goes.

I recently read a book called “how to get anyone to SAY YES, in 8 minutes”. What I learned is that when persons are approached by someone they are not familiar with or have no prior relationship, their automatic unconscious response to any offer you make to them is repulsion. People do not know they behave in this fashion; this, on the surface explains why when approaching celebrities or sports players in a club, they are befuddled by my approach and I never hear from them. The NBA/NFL trains athletes to be on guard for people who try and sell them on business investments or financial advisement services, (not absolutely sure if they train them to be leery of Black American people; but looking at how adamantly they tried to convince LeBron James to not let his close, past high school state championship bound, team mates/friends handle his business affairs, I wouldn’t doubt it). Even with the hermetic club scenery and training of freshly minted millionaires to be on guard, I have read of many financial advisors, CEOs of hedge funds and stock brokers meeting clients sitting next to a pool on vacation or in a country club, being handed brochures out the trunk of a person’s car and later following up to do significant business with that person. So while it’s understood about the unconscious response, shouldn’t there also be an override to get to a positive response, at least to exchange telephone numbers and let the person work to set up a proper meeting, when approached by someone from your own race, whom you know is limited in opportunity and resources, whom you share many cultural traits and shibboleths, seemingly intelligent and articulate with enough nerve and chutzpah and ingenuity to approach you; at the very least, a hustler, grinding to make his/her life legally better?

I have tried to get persons I’ve been associated with all my teenage years and the bulk of my adult life, from my hometown where I grew to get me a meeting with NFL players they were directly related to in reference to being their CPA or giving me a reference to another rookie player or just giving me tips as to what they expect out of their professional CPA who handles their tax filings or financial management. I was granted no such meetings nor spoke with the players to receive no such advice or references.  No other race behaves in this manner and it is a PURE SHAME and lack of intelligence and non-support on our part as a race perpetually discriminated against by every other race within America.

As the population continues to grow within America, as immigrants legal and illegal enter the country with their hunger for survival and – find a needle in a haystack – work ethic, and government relief (Welfare and Affirmative Action) roles continue to get smaller and/or non-existent, it is imperative we as Black American people, especially those of us who are entrepreneurs do business with one another, establish scholarships to put our children (especially young men) through universities, teach them through interning and apprenticeship and hire them into long-term gainful employment positions. For Black American people and Black American men to survive, going forward, there must be an effort to trust in the education and work ethic of ourselves; even switching out the professional services that were sought upon persons of other races and replacing them with future growing professionals of our own race and culture. It is not a matter of reverse discrimination, but a matter of survival and a reprove to a system that has always treated us unfairly and will continue to do so. An interpolation of a lyric by Phife from A Tribe Called Quest in which he said, “Ego, I’m on my own jock still / cause if I don’t say I’m the best  / tell me who the hell will” (“Word Play” Beats Rhymes and Life album) I say “BLACK AMERICAN PEOPLE  / we must be on our own jock still / cause If we don’t say we the best, tell me who the hell will?” NO ONE!